Wills and Living Trusts – Do You Need Both?

DuPage County estate planning lawyersEstate planning is a complex and highly personalized process (at least it should be), and that means that no two estate plans are exactly the same. However, there are similarities and generalized information that one can use to determine which estate planning option may be most appropriate for their situation.

Consider, for example, the comparison of a will and living trust. Each strategy works the same, regardless of your situation, but your situation may warrant that you use one document or the other. Also, there may be certain scenarios in which both strategies are needed. Learn more about when this may occur, and discover how our seasoned estate planning lawyers can assist you in developing an estate plan that suits your needs.

Comparing Wills and Living Trusts

Although wills and living trusts both allow you to name beneficiaries and designate where assets will go upon your death, they do so in very different ways. Wills communicate your wishes upon your death, and they do not typically require you to do anything extra; you simply need to create it, register it, and ensure that loved ones know where to find a copy.

Living trusts can also designate assets and identify trustees, but you have more control over when and how the assets are assigned. For example, you can transfer your home to a beneficiary before your death, rather than after your death, to help them avoid probate after your death. Using a living trust over a will could also result in a more expedient transfer of property to the beneficiary. In short, living trusts can reduce the legal costs and delays that are often associated with probate over a contested will.

When Both May Be Needed

While most parties need only a will or living trust, there are certain situations that may warrant both. If, for example, you have assets that do not have value (i.e. items of sentiment, pets, etc.) that you want to go to a specific beneficiary, a will can help you do that. However, if you also have substantial assets that could go to probate, you may still need a living will to protect your beneficiary from the resulting delays and legal costs that might occur if someone does contest the validity of your will. An attorney can help you better understand what other situations might warrant both a living trust and a will.

Contact Our DuPage County Estate Planning Lawyers

Backed by more than 40 years of experience, Stock, Carlson, Oldfield & McGrath, LLC can skillfully assist you in developing an estate plan that suits your family’s needs. Dedicated to ensuring your wishes are carried out, even after your death, our DuPage County estate planning lawyers can examine your situation, explain your options, and execute whatever strategy appeals to you. Call 630-665-2500 to schedule your personalized consultation today.

Source:

http://www.oregonlive.com/business/index.ssf/2018/01/liz_weston_living_trusts_can_h.html

Uncertainty and Changing Tax Laws Should Not Delay Estate Planning

Wheaton wills and trusts attorneysWhile some people may be rejoicing the recent pass-through of the House’s Tax Cut and Jobs Act, others may be experiencing uncertainty over the future. Sadly, this apprehension can cause those individuals to delay or even completely forgo estate planning. Learn why this is usually a poor decision, gain insight on how the bill might affect your heirs if it is passed into law, and discover what an experienced attorney can do to protect your family after your death.

The Danger of Estate Planning Delays

It can be tempting to put off estate planning, especially if you are young and healthy, but doing so can have dire consequences. Accidents occur, and even the healthiest of people can suffer a tragic illness. If one occurs and you pass away or are rendered incapacitated, you and your heirs may suffer. For example, there may be no one to make medical decisions for you, so you may be forced to endure the standard of care, despite not wanting resuscitation. Another possible consequence is that your family could be left without access to money for bills and daily expenses if you have not named a power of attorney. Thankfully, such issues can be mitigated against (and perhaps even avoided altogether) with a carefully thought-out estate plan.

Bill Would Not Eliminate the Need for Estate Planning

Although the passage of the Tax Cut and Jobs Act may lead some to believe that they no longer need an estate plan, the clear and evidenced dangers of not having one makes it abundantly clear that – at the very least – a valid will is needed. There are also other, independent concerns that individuals should be aware of, such as when and why a more comprehensive estate plan may be needed.

Consider an individual who has left behind the typical blended family: an ex-wife, wife, children, and step-children. After spending years on building and developing bonds to create a healthy and functional family, a freak accident occurs and the individual passes away. Wracked with grief and highly sentimental over a few prized possessions, the previously intact family, starts to argue over whom receives what. If severe enough, that contention can break the bonds of family, perhaps permanently.

Had the individual created a will or trust, there would have been no confusion over where the assets were meant to go. Because of this, heirs are more likely to receive their portion of the estate, and the risk of probate is dramatically reduced. Legal costs and taxes are also typically lower for heirs, and the amount of time that it takes to divide the estate is usually shorter. In short, an estate plan can protect heirs from some of the most common estate planning issues.

Contact Our Wheaton Estate Planning Lawyers

If you have been delaying the creation of an estate plan because of apprehension or misguided information over how the new bill may impact your family’s future, contact Stock, Carlson, Oldfield & McGrath, LLC for assistance. Our seasoned Wheaton estate planning lawyers can examine your situation, advise you of your options, and assist you in developing creative solutions that can hopefully satisfy your needs. Call 630-665-2500 and schedule your personalized consultation with us to get started.

Source:

https://www.fool.com/taxes/2017/10/21/3-reasons-youll-still-need-estate-planning-even-if.aspx

Estate Planning for College – Why Every Young Adult Needs a Will

DuPage County wills and trusts attorneyMost people assume that estate planning is only needed when you are old and nearing death or retirement. Quite the opposite is true, however. In fact, adults of all ages – even those just heading off for college – should have a comprehensive estate plan in place. Learn why, discover what estate planning documents are important, and see how an experienced estate planning attorney can help you get started.

Why Estate Planning is Important for Young Adults

Young adults may not have a lot of assets or possessions to speak of; they may not even have an income, but they still need an estate plan. The reason for this is simple: like everyone else, they still run the risk of incapacitation, should an accident or injury occur. Without the proper documents in place, parents may be unable to obtain pertinent medical information about their adult child’s condition or prognosis; they may also be denied the ability to make medical decisions for their child. Parents may also be denied access to their child’s financial accounts, which could endanger the student’s ability to return to school or dorm.

Meeting the Estate Planning Needs of Young Adults

Estate planning is different for young adults. They do not typically need things like living trusts, special protection clauses, or transfers upon death. Instead, the focus needs to be on ensuring that the young adult has someone listed as their medical and financial proxy. Young adults are also encouraged to consider what life-saving measures they are comfortable with receiving, and when so that they can outline this in an advanced directive.

It is important to understand that the process is not necessarily easier, simply because there are fewer documents. If anything, the estate planning needs of young adults can be both confusing and complex. Expanding circles, newfound independence, and concerns over parental access to grades and other pertinent information may create special needs or requirements. Furthermore, it is important that all aspects of a young adult’s life are considered, should a death over occur. Some elements can be easy to miss, especially when one considers the amount of digital information that most millennials have.

Contact Our DuPage County Wills and Trusts Lawyers

With more than 40 years of experience, Stock, Carlson, Oldfield & McGrath, LLC is the firm to trust with your estate planning needs. Regardless of your age, circumstances, or wealth, our DuPage County wills and trusts attorneys provide comprehensive and attentive services. Schedule a personalized consultation to get started. Call 630-665-2500 today.

Source:

https://www.wsj.com/articles/why-your-collegeage-children-need-an-estate-plan-1379810952